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8 Historic Names

Éamonn CeanntÉamonn Ceannt (Edward Thomas Kent) (21 Sept 1881 – 8 May 1916) 

Commandant of the 4th Battalion Dublin Brigade Irish Volunteers who garrisoned the South Dublin Union during the Easter Rising of 1916. The 4th Battalion held the SDU with no more than 65 men against a combined British Force of 500 Royal Irish Regiment, Sherwood Forresters and Dublin Metropolitan Police.

His SDU command was not taken, but he was ordered to surrender by his commander in chief Padraig Pearse. After his surrender he was tried with the other leaders of the rising and executed at Kilmainham Gaol, on 8 May 1916.

Ceannt Fort (McCaffrey’s Estate) is named in his honour.

William McDowell

William McDowell
(24 Dec 1867 – 24 Apr 1916)
‘B’ Coy 4th Battalion Dublin Brigade Irish Volunteers

Killed in a field between Nurses Home and Convent where 2 soldiers were posted in the upper windows of Hospital No’s 2 & 3. At his death he was earning £2-2-0 weekly as a house painter and left a widow with 4 children aged 16, 14, 10 and 8.

McDowell Avenue is named in his memory.

Richard O'Reilly

Richard O’Reilly
(12th March 1896– 24 Apr 1916)
‘K’ Coy 4th Battalion Dublin Brigade Irish Volunteers

Killed in action in the fields between the Nurses Home and the Convent in the South Dublin Union. His brother John ‘C’ Coy also fought at the SDU but was not aware his younger brother was dead. Richard is buried in Glasnevin Cemetery.

O’Reilly Avenue is named in his memory.

John Owens

John Owens
(Oct 1891– 24 Apr 1916)
‘B’ Coy 4th Battalion Dublin Brigade Irish Volunteers

Sean (John) Owens was one of the first casualties of the Rising. He was killed in an attack on the South Dublin Union by the 3rd Battalion of the Royal Irish Regiment, less than two hours after Eamon Ceannt led his men into occupation of the building.

Owens Avenue is named in his memory.

Frank Burke

Frank Burke
(1897 – 25 Apr 1916)
Section Commander, ‘C’ Coy 4th Battalion Dublin Brigade Irish Volunteers

Brother of John Burke the Irish contralto and a stepbrother of W.T. Cosgrave. Lived at 174 James’s Street, above the Public House which still exists as Kenny’s Lounge. Killed in Action on the 25th of April 1916 at 7.30 am in the Nurses Home by a sniper concealed in the Maternity Hospital which faced the Nurses Home.

Burke Place is named in his memory.

John Traynor

John Traynor
(22 May 1898 – 24 Apr 1916)
‘B’ Coy 4th Battalion Dublin Brigade Irish Volunteers

Part of Captain George Irvine’s group of seven who were assigned by Eamonn Ceannt to guard the rear gates of the South Dublin Union at the Rialto Bridge. Fatally shot through the chest by random fire which peppered the sheds in which he was stationed. He was 17 years old when he died.

Traynor Place is named in his memory.

Originally house numbers 75 to 82 (O’Reilly Avenue) and 171 to 179 were known as Traynor Place.

Brendan Donnellan

Brendan Donelan
(Mar 1898 – 24 Apr 1916)
‘B’ Coy 4th Battalion Dublin Brigade Irish Volunteers

He was 1 of 6 men detailed to defend the Rialto Gate end of the South Dublin Union. While retreating towards the Head Quarters of the Volunteers in the Nurses Home, Brendan Donelan and James Quinn were shot. Brendan was 18 years old and died while he lay in the field. He is buried in Grave PG 26 1/2, Dublin Section, Glasnevin Cemetery.

Donnellan Avenue is named in his memory.

The Find A Grave website mentions that “there  is some confusion over his surname which has been recorded as Donellan/Donlan/Donnellan/Donelan.”

James Quinn

James Quinn
(12 Sep 1870 – 24 Apr 1916)
‘D’ Coy 4th Battalion Dublin Brigade Irish Volunteers

Killed holding the Rialto entrance to the rear of the South Dublin Union. He left a widow and 5 young children.

He is buried in the 1916 Plot in St Pauls Glasnevin.

Quinn Avenue is named in his memory.

Many thanks to resident John Lane for his work researching and gathering the content for this page.